Insurance fraud claims highlighted

Published 14/04/2015 | 00:00

At the Wright Insurance Haulage Seminar in White's of Wexford (from left) back, Brian Cullen, Michael O'Brien, Sharyn Doyle, Eddie Ervine and Mark Stamper; front, Tony Wright, Eoin Gavin and Pat Wright.
At the Wright Insurance Haulage Seminar in White's of Wexford (from left) back, Brian Cullen, Michael O'Brien, Sharyn Doyle, Eddie Ervine and Mark Stamper; front, Tony Wright, Eoin Gavin and Pat Wright.

THE increasing number of fraudulent and staged motor claims are a major problem for the insurance industry and add at least €50 in additional premium to every policy issued in this country.

The cold, hard facts were starkly laid out at the Wright Insurance Haulage Seminar held last week at White's Hotel in Wexford.

The first speaker was Michael O'Brien, of Michael O'Brien Solicitors, who warned of the increasing trend of fraudulent claims and staged claims, and outlined some methods to help in not becoming a victim of such scams.

This involves both cars and particularly HGVs, and Mr O'Brien outlined how such claims can be staged, and disclosed that these claims are costing insurance companies €200 million per year

Attendance at the seminar, the third hosted by Wright Insurance Brokers, was significantly up on previous years, and is proving to be an increasingly popular event with haulage contractors, insurers, and others involved in services to the industry.

The seminar was opened by Tony Wright, CEO of the company. MC for the evening was Sharyn Doyle, Team Leader of the Transport & Logistics Division.

Following Mr. O'Brien's address, Eddie Erving, Sales Director of Autoglass, who addressed the potential of problems for insurers, hauliers, motorists and windscreen replacement companies, due to the need to provide not just replacement glass, but also to calibrate it because of the increasing number of vehicles being manufactured with the windscreen being an integral part the telematics in these vehicles.

If this glass is not properly calibrated following replacement, it could lead to the sensors being inaccurate, causing accidents. He posed the question as to who will pay for this calibration, and announced that his company had already invested in the necessary equipment and training to enable them overcome this problem. He followed this with a video showing driverless cars and trucks of the future.

Following this presentation it was the turn of Mark Stamper of Intelligent Telematics, who argued in favour of installing recording cameras in trucks, which will give an accurate account of most accidents that might occur involving the vehicle. President of the Irish Road Hauliers Association Eoin Gavin made some startling revelations about the number of Irish Haulage contractors who had re-registered the businesses out of Ireland, to UK and Europe. This was primarily due to the motor tax disadvantages faced by hauliers in Ireland, and he highlighted that a very high percentage of those who had re-registered were from the South East. The final item, introduced by Pat Wright, Group Transport & Logistics Director, was a short film that the company had commissioned taking a mostly factual, but highly comical, look at the history and future of the haulage business in Ireland.

Wexford People

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