Glenbrien native Monsignor Doyle jets in from Miami to celebrate 60th jubilee

BY Amy Lewis

Published 23/07/2016 | 00:00

ABOVE: Monsignor Seamus Doyle celebrating his 60th jubilee in the Riverside Park Hotel, pictured with his nephews Brendan and Michael Doyle and niece Aine Doyle; LEFT: Mgr Doyle with his sister Rita Cahill
ABOVE: Monsignor Seamus Doyle celebrating his 60th jubilee in the Riverside Park Hotel, pictured with his nephews Brendan and Michael Doyle and niece Aine Doyle; LEFT: Mgr Doyle with his sister Rita Cahill
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Monsignor Seamus Doyle jetted into Wexford recently to celebrate his 60th jubilee with family and friends from across the country.

The Glenbrien native flew in from Miami, where he began working in the Diocese in 1970. However, it was in his home village of Glenbrien where Monsignor Doyle said his first mass in 1956. Many people from his local parish joined him at his recent celebration in the Riverside Park Hotel to mark the significant occasion.

'It was great to be home to celebrate with my family and people from Glenbrien,' said Monsignor Doyle, who is now retired but still lives in Miami. 'My sister lives in Clonmel and she came along. With me was Bishop of Orlando John Noonan, while Bishop Denis Browne from New Zealand also came.'

Monsignor Doyle trained as a priest in St Peter's Seminary and before long, moved to New Zealand where he remained as a priest for almost 15 years. He moved to Miami in 1970 and though he is retired now, he still assists with masses there.

'It was always a joy to come home,' said Monsignor Doyle. 'Since I came to the US, I've been able to get home every year and I thought it would be a good idea to come back and celebrate and create an interest in vocations in Ireland.'

Though Monsignor Doyle doesn't feel there is much of an interest amongst Irish people in joining the priesthood, he believes that things will change.

'At the moment, there seems to be a big lull in vocations in the priesthood in Ireland. In the 50s and 60s, we were sending priests all over the world. Now seminaries are empty.'

'I think times will change again though.'

Wexford People

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