Paul gets the keys to the past with the oldest home in Dublin

By amy lewis

Published 10/11/2015 | 00:00

Paul Sinnott outside and inside the historic property he purchased, now confirmed as the oldest house in Dublin.
Paul Sinnott outside and inside the historic property he purchased, now confirmed as the oldest house in Dublin.
Paul Sinnott outside and inside the historic property he purchased, now confirmed as the oldest house in Dublin.

A Wexford builder unknowingly landed himself with a significant piece of history when the house he purchased last year was declared as the oldest in Dublin.

Paul Sinnott, who now lives in Kildare, was looking for investment properties when he bought 130 Thomas Street for €125,000 in March 2014. Though Paul was unaware just how old the house was when he purchased it, he was immediately intrigued by the distinctive early staircase with its 'barley sugar' balustrade. He then called upon conservation architect David Averill, who sent wood from various parts of the house to Queens University in Belfast for carbon testing. Four months later and it was confirmed that Paul held the keys to the oldest intact house in Dublin.

Dating back to 1639, 130 Thomas Street is one of the first brick houses in the capital. Before its discovery, the oldest surviving house in Dublin was 9/9A Aungier Street which was built 25 years later.

The three storey house was first identified by Dublin Civic Trust who requested an urgent protective structure designation from Dublin City Council when they caught sight of the staircase. Paul now hopes to convert it into two apartments and a shop while still preserving its historic significance.

Wexford People

Read More

Most Read

Promoted articles

News