Stars of the past to be feted at Seana Ghael awards

Over 60 merit awards to be presented next Sunday

Published 16/01/2016 | 00:00

Dickie Butler
Dickie Butler
Jimmy Browne
Johnny Bates
Tom Aherne
Kit Codd
Martin Byrne
Tom Byrne
Josie Cashin
Con Dowdall
Jimmy Cullen
Joe Doran
Tom Daly
Tommy Delaney
Donal Doyle
Jimmy Fanning
Jim Fleming
Sean Doyle
Profiles by P.J. Daly

Stalwart service over many years on the playing fields of Wexford will be honoured and recognised once again on Sunday when over 60 Seana Ghael awards will be presented at the annual function in the Ferrycarrig Hotel from 2 to 6 p.m.

This week we present part one of our profiles of the recipients, in alphabetical order, with the remainder to follow in the weeks to come. The information has been gathered and compiled by Seana Ghael committee member P.J. DALY.

TOM AHERNE (ST. AIDAN'S, SHAMROCKS, FAYTHE HARRIERS): When Tom Aherne arrived in Enniscorthy in 1966 as a member of An Garda Síochana, very few people apart from his colleagues in the Cathedral town station knew who he was.

However, 18 months later after a brilliant performance for his club, St. Aidan's, versus the Shamrocks, he became a well-known name in the town of Enniscorthy. A good goalkeeper is welcomed in any club and St. Aidan's were lucky in finding one of the best in Tom.

His lightning reflexes, his composure, keen eye, courage and his speed of thought were brilliant. Tom settled down quickly with his club and he inspired great confidence in the men in front of him.

When danger threatened he was quick off his mark to avert problems. A native of Co. Cork where he learned his hurling skills as a netminder, one of his finest attributes was to be able to judge the flight of the ball as it came into his danger zone and have it out downfield in a flash.

He was born in 1943 and was educated at Kilworth N.S. and Fermoy C.B.S. His boyhood hero was Christy Ring R.I.P. The two best dual players he has seen in Ireland were Des Foley R.I.P. (Dublin) and Teddy McCarthy (Cork). In Wexford, Phil Wilson was the best he has seen at both codes.

The best goalie he has seen in hurling was Pat Nolan (Oylegate-Glenbrien) who gave a brilliant performance versus Limerick in the 1973 National League final.

The hurlers that impressed him most over the last 30 years were D.J. Carey (Kilkenny), Nicky English (Tipperary), Henry Shefflin (Kilkenny) and John Fenton (Cork). The best club side he has seen in Wexford was the Buffers Alley team in the '70s and '80s.

The four forwards that he feared the most were Tony Doran, Paul Lynch R.I.P., John Quigley and Con Dowdall. He played Juvenile and Minor with St. Martin's of Kilworth, Co. Cork, and Junior at adult level.

He was an executive committee member with the Faythe Harriers from 1985 to 2009, Coiste na nÓg mentor and selector, and Coiste na nÓg Secretary in 1998-1999. He was also elected club life member in 2009.

The best individual display he has seen at club level in hurling was Martin Casey's workrate with Buffers Alley in the second-half performance from a half-time deficit to draw with a highly-rated Rathnure in the 1988 Senior hurling final. Buffers Alley went on to win the replay and subsequently went on to win the All-Ireland Club final of 1989.

The two hurlers he would select as the best he has seen from each of his three Wexford clubs were Eddie Kelly (St. Aidan's), Paul Lynch R.I.P. (Shamrocks), Harry O'Connor R.I.P. (St. Aidan's), Matt Browne (Shamrocks), Seamus Quaid R.I.P. (Faythe Harriers) and Con Dowdall (Faythe Harriers).

The best game of hurling he has seen in Wexford was that Senior drawn final in 1988 between Buffers Alley and Rathnure. It was a great game of skill, endeavour and passion.

He played with St. Aidan's and Shamrocks from 1967 to 1971 and with Faythe Harriers from 1971 to 1974. The best footballer he has ever seen was Mick O'Connell and in Wexford, Matty Forde. The best goalie he has ever seen in football was Billy Morgan (Cork).

JOHNNY BATES (KILMORE): Johnny Bates who now resides in the Barntown area was another of those great prospects that arrived on the scene in the late '50s with Kilmore-Rathangan under-age teams.

When he moved up a step to play in the adult games he was equally effective, combining speed, agility, composure and an astute brain which helped him to prise his way past surprised defenders. He was only 16 years old when he played his first adult game.

He was very alert and was brilliant in finding the open spaces which enabled him to get scores from all angles. He was an excellent free-taker and could shoot the ball over the bar from any range.

Johnny was always full of running and his elusive style was a headache for a number of defenders he came in contact with. For the Kilmore team, in 1962, Johnny was their top scorer with 3-22, with 0-11 coming from frees, in six games played.

He was born in 1942 and was educated at Mulrankin N.S. His boyhood hero was Nickey Rackard R.I.P. The best goalie he has ever seen in football was Stephen Cluxton (Dublin). The two best dual players he has seen in Wexford were Jack Berry R.I.P. (St. Anne's) and Jim O'Neill R.I.P. (Kilmore). In Ireland the two top dual players he has seen were Jimmy Barry-Murphy (Cork) and Teddy McCarthy (Cork).

One of Johnny's finest hours playing with Kilmore was in the 1962 Co. Junior football win versus Castletown. At right half-forward he was outstanding. He enriched his followers with his intelligient and brainy play. He roamed all over the field and was never found wanting in his half-forward duties.

Of the great Wexford team in the '50s, Ned Wheeler was his favourite player. Johnny won the following medals during his playing career: one Rackard league hurling 1956, one Rackard league football, 1959 Minor hurling, 1959 Minor football, 1960 Minor hurling, 1960 Minor football, 1962 Co. Junior football and 1967 Co. Special Junior football The three best footballers he has seen in Ireland in the last 20 years were Peter Canavan, Bernard Brogan and Colm Cooper. The three best footballers he has seen in Wexford in the past ten years were Matty Forde, Colm Morris and P.J. Banville.

The greatest football club team he has seen in Wexford was Castletown in their prime. The best individual display he has seen at club level was by Paddy Meyler in the 1959 Minor football win with Kilmore-Rathangan versus Ferns.

The four best Kilmore players he has seen were Paddy Meyler, Fergus Duff R.I.P., Jim O'Neill R.I.P. and Jim Hughes. The four most difficult footballers he played on were Larry Byrne (St. Anne's), Geoff Barry (St. Anne's), Con Malone (Dan O'Connell's) and Rory Kelly (Sarsfields). He played Minor football for Wexford in 1959 and 1960.

The two best footballers he has ever seen were Maurice Fitzgerald and Peter Canavan. The best game of football he has seen in Wexford was the 2011 Senior final, Horeswood versus Castletown. He said the Rackard league that started in 1956 was a great idea as it brought young fellows to the top.

JIMMY BROWNE (NAOMH EANNA): Jimmy Browne, who resides in the Garden City in Gorey, was born in 1945 and was educated at Gorey C.B.S.

For many, many years he was to the forefront of everything that happened in G.A.A. affairs in Gorey town with the Wolfe Tones and Naomh Eanna under-age.

He was the last Secretary of the famous Gorey Blues football club, District Secretary of Bord na nOg and Gorey District Chairman of Bord na Og. He was a selector with the Wexford Under-14 hurlers, winners of Tony Forristal Cup in 1997.

As a dual player he performed with excellence in both codes. He was very mobile, had good vision and his intelligence rating was very high. He played both hurling and football with great drive and purpose and was excellent in assessing a situation.

Jimmy's ability to find space in the tightest of clusters was praiseworthy. He was always infused with lots of confidence and was cool, calm and composed in every outing. His boyhood hero was Mick O'Connell. The three goalies that impressed him the most over the years in hurling were Ollie Walsh R.I.P., Damien Fitzhenry and Ger Cunningham (Cork).

The four best hurlers he has seen in Wexford in the last 40 years were Tony Doran, Mick Jacob, Liam Dunne and Larry O'Gorman. The two best dual players he has seen in Ireland were Teddy McCarthy and Jimmy Barry-Murphy. In Wexford he selects Phil Wilson and George O'Connor.

Of the present-day players he selects Patrick Horgan, Patrick 'Bonner' Maher, Richie Hogan and Conor McDonald as outstanding.

Jimmy played Juvenile hurling and football in 1960 and 1961 and Minor hurling and football in 1962 and 1963. He won one Co. Juvenile football medal with Young Emmets in 1959 and was captain of the team which lost the 1960 Co. final. In 1962 he won a Co. Minor football medal with the same club.

He played for Wexford in Under-21 football in 1966.

One of the greatest games of hurling he has seen was Rathnure versus Oulart-The Ballagh in the 1974 Co. Senior final. In the same game, Mick Jacob for Oulart-The Ballagh gave one of the finest exhibitions of defensive hurling he has ever seen in a Co. final.

One of the best club teams he has seen in hurling was the Oulart-The Ballagh team which won five Co. titles in a row.

Four of the greatest hurlers he has ever seen were Mick Jacob, Diarmuid O'Sullivan (Cork), Eddie Keher and Jimmy Doyle R.I.P. Tom Dempsey, Martin Storey and Billy Byrne were other players that stood out over the years.

The greatest hurler he has ever seen in Wexford was Nickey Rackard R.I.P. who, along with his brother Bobby R.I.P., Tim Flood R.I.P. and Ned Wheeler, were his favourites in the great Wexford team of the '50s.

When playing in the club games he always found it difficult to handle Tony Doran. The Naomh Eanna players that impressed him the most were Billy Byrne, Seánie Kinsella, Rory Kinsella, Ger Cushe and lately Conor McDonald.

Jimmy played with his club until 1971 when he received a serious injury which forced him to give up the game he loved. One of the greatest footballers he has seen was Ger Power (Kerry) who could play brilliantly as a defender or up playing in the forwards. Two of the best full-backs he has seen were Pat Hartigan (Limerick) in hurling and John O'Keeffe (Kerry) in football.

DICKIE BUTLER (ST. JAMES'): When a conversation comes up about St. James' (Ramsgrange) G.A.A. club it is usually about the fortunes of their footballers.

Down through the years the club did produce some excellent players like Jimmy Kennedy R.I.P. of Wexford fame.

The club must also be remembered for turning out some starwarts in the hurling scene. One example was Pat Walsh R.I.P., one of the finest wing half-backs that the game has seen, as well as Richie Butler who was a superb goalie, Mick Kent and Dickie Butler.

Dick was an exceptionally talented half-forward showing great courage, guile, grit and physical fitness. His control with the ball, his quick burst of speed and his nimbleness caused mounting despair to the opponents' rearguard.

His brilliant express forward play of accuracy and clever tricks and his first touch were exemplary. Dickie's distribution of the ball amongst his co-attackers was destructive to the opposition.

He was born in 1943 and was educated at Duncannon N.S. and Ramsgrange V.C. His boyhood hero was Nickey Rackard R.I.P.

One of the best goalies he has seen in hurling was Ollie Walsh R.I.P. The four St. James' hurlers who impressed Dickie the most were Pat Walsh R.I.P., Richie Butler (goalie), Willie Meyler and Patrick Butler. The four most difficult opponents he encountered during his hurling career were Paddy Foley (Horeswood), Con Donnelly (Clongeen), Seán Myers R.I.P. (Gusserane) and Tom Fardy R.I.P. (Clongeen).

The two best dual players he has seen in Ireland were Des Foley R.I.P. and Jimmy Barry-Murphy. In Wexford, Paddy Kehoe and Phil Wilson were out on their own as special in both codes.

The greatest hurlers he has ever seen were Mick Roche (Tipperary), Martin Óg Morrissey (Waterford), Jimmy Brohan (Cork), Tom Cheasty R.I.P. (Waterford) and Henry Shefflin.

The hurlers who were his favourites in the great '50s team were Jim Morrissey R.I.P., Tim Flood R.I.P., Bobby Rackard R.I.P. and Ned Wheeler. In the last 40 years the ones that impressed him the most were Tony Doran, Mick Jacob, Martin Quigley and Ned Buggy.

Dickie won two Co. Juvenile medals in 1958, hurling with Aclare-Horeswood and football with St. James'. The great Tommy Harrell was captain of the hurling side. He played Minor with the same clubs.

Two of the best club teams he has seen were Rathnure in the early '70s and St. Aidan's in the '50s.

One of the greatest and the most exciting games he has ever witnessed was Wexford versus Cork in the 1956 All-Ireland final.

The finest display he has seen by any player was given by Mick Roche (Tipperary) in the opening 30 minutes in the 1968 All-Ireland final.

One of the best midfielders he has seen playing the game was Frank Cummins (Kilkenny). Dickie also played football for a number of years with St. James' in the forwards.

Hurlers from the New Ross area that stood out were Ned Colfer, Tom Neville, Paddy Whitty (Horeswood), Noel O'Gorman, Jimmy Galway and a great goalie in Jimmy Murphy (Horeswood).

One of Dickie's finest hours with St. James' was versus Horeswood in the New Ross District championship. He was in brilliant form in his left half-forward position, scoring 1-5.

His late mother, Mary Ann Butler (nee Murphy), played camogie for Wexford. Dickie played the game of hurling over 20 years and was well into his 40s when he gave up. Some of the finest St. James' footballers he ever saw were Din O'Regan R.I.P., James McDonald, Mick Meyler and John Kehoe.

MARTIN BYRNE (BLACKWATER): Martin's hurling career in Wexford was a short one due to his leaving our shores in 1955 to work in England. During the period of time he played hurling in Wexford, he made a big impression with the followers around the area.

He played Juvenile hurling with Kilmuckridge and Minor hurling with Oulart's Fr. Murphy's. They had a brilliant Minor hurling team in 1953, but they were defeated in the Co. final by an even better one, the Faythe Harriers. In 1954, he won his first Co. medal when he was a member of the Rockies football team which won the Minor title.

A second medal followed in 1957 when he came home to play a big part in Blackwater winning the Co. Junior hurling final with victory versus St. Bennan's (Davidstown). Martin played at centre half-back and had a brilliant game. He hoovered up everything that came down the centre and his first-time ground striking and his brilliant connection with the aerial ball was outstanding.

He looked superbly fit and was going as strong at the end as he was at the start. He continued for another number of games whenever the club needed him on their team. Once he started hurling across the water, his visits came to an end.

However, his interest was always with his beloved club Blackwater, and he followed their progress to the present day. He was born in 1936 and resided in Mulgannon just at the entrance to the Wexford golf course. His father passed away when was only five years old R.I.P.

The family moved to Crosshue in Blackwater and for the hurling then it was Blackwater all the way. In England he played with Dr. Croke's and Fr. Murphy's in Birmingham. With Dr. Croke's he won two Senior championship medals and three league titles, and with Fr. Murphy's he won one Junior championship medal in 1971 and one Junior league medal in 1970. He was 35 years old when he retired from the game.

He was educated at Blackwater N.S. and Kilmuckridge V.S. His boyhood hero was like so many others, Nickey Rackard R.I.P. Paddy Kehoe, Ned Wheeler and Jim Morrissey R.I.P. were other heroes in his young days.

He first played Junior with Blackwater in 1953 when he was just 17 years old. Two of the greatest goalies he has seen in hurling were Tony Reddin, and Art Foley of Wexford.

One of the finest games he played in was versus St. Bennan's in the 1957 Co. Junior hurling final. He had a brilliant game playing with composure, precision and style. His most disappointing game was losing the 1953 Co. Minor hurling final to the Faythe Harriers.

The four Blackwater players that impressed him the most were P.J. Whelan R.I.P., Johnny Doran R.I.P., James Ormonde and Mogue O'Leary. The four opponents who caused him the most problems in his days in Wexford were Oliver McGrath (Faythe Harriers), Seán Dempsey (Kilmuckridge), Pat Kehoe (Rathnure) and Johnny O'Brien (Young Emmets).

When playing Minor hurling with Oulart, they had excellent teams in 1953 and 1954. They had two great games versus Ballinavary Emmets in the 1954 Co. semi-final, losing in the replay.

The four outstanding hurlers he has seen in Wexford in the last 40 years were Mick Jacob, Tony Doran, Martin Quigley and Ned Buggy. Johnny Doran R.I.P. from Blackwater was one of the finest half-forwards he has seen. Jim Rogers and Paddy Kehoe were two of the greatest footballers he has seen in Wexford.

One of the greatest Minor hurlers he has seen was Vinny Bell (Dublin) in the 1954 All-Ireland final which was played before the Senior final of Cork versus Wexford. One of the greatest individual performances he has seen was the display given by Bobby Rackard R.I.P. for Wexford versus Cork. When he moved back to full-back, Martin would have loved to have been behind that goal to see him performing and hoping to get a few tips and ideas from the great man.

Hurlers that really impressed him lately were Henry Shefflin, Tommy Walsh and J.J. Delaney.

TOM BYRNE (ASKAMORE-KILRUSH): Tom Byrne, who resides at the Rock Tavern a few miles from Carnew, was a permanent fixture with the Askamore hurling club from 1962 to 1977.

He usually played at right half-back, where his wholehearted endeavour and the will to win were just two of his many outstanding attributes to the game of hurling. He was never found wanting in any of his duels with his opponents and always remained in control of his area. He relentlessly drove back numerous forays by the opposition with ease.

Tom never allowed himself to be intimidated by any individual and he always made sure to get to the ball first in every encounter. He was born in 1942 and was educated at Ballyroebuck N.S. His boyhood hero was Nickey Rackard R.I.P.

The two best dual players he has seen were Des Foley R.I.P. (Dublin)

and Teddy McCarthy (Cork). In Wexford, Phil Wilson, Joe Foley and Oliver Cullen were masterclass at both games.

The four hurlers from the Askamore club that stood out over the years were Matt Boggan, Michael Murphy, John Tobin and Eamon O'Neill. The hurlers from Wexford that impressed him the most in the last 40 years were Tony Doran, Mick Jacob, Martin Quigley, Willie Murphy and Larry O'Gorman.

The four greatest hurlers he has ever seen were Joe Salmon R.I.P. (Galway), D.J. Carey, Jimmy Doyle R.I.P. and Henry Shefflin. Matt Boggan's display for Askamore in the 1969 Co. Junior hurling final versus St. Fintan's was one of the finest he has seen.

Tom's finest hour was versus Rathgarogue-Cushinstown in the 1969 Co. Junior hurling semi-final. At right half-back he played a superb game, hurling with zest, confidence and vigour throughout the hour.

He won one Co. Junior hurling medal with Askamore in 1969 and one Co. Intermediate hurling medal with the same club in 1976. He also won one Co. Wicklow Senior hurling medal with Kilcoole in 1971 and one Co. Wicklow Juvenile hurling medal in 1958. He got a few Gorey District medals also.

On the great team Wexford had in the '50s, his favourites were Tim Flood R.I.P., Billy Rackard R.I.P., Jim Morrissey R.I.P. and Ned Wheeler. One of the great games of hurling he has seen was the 2013 All-Ireland final drawn game between Clare and Cork.

His five brothers were all outstanding hurlers - Jim, Seán, Mike, Luke and Art. The four most difficult opponents he encountered while playing were Tommy Hawkins (Ferns), Seánie Kinsella (Gorey), Pat Cullen (Ballyfad) and Joe Doyle (Craanford). At club level in Wexford one of the best games of hurling he has seen was the 1975 Co. Senior final between Buffers Alley winning versus Oulart-The Ballagh. Mick Jacob at centre half-back gave an exhibition of hurling in this encounter.

One of the most exciting and memorable games of hurling that he played in was the 1969 Co. Junior final. To win the game for the many brilliant supporters of the club was indeed a joyous occasion.

One of the best full-backs he has seen in hurling was Nick O'Donnell R.I.P. The best centrefield hurler was Ned Wheeler and the best centre half-forward was Tom Cheasty R.I.P. (Waterford). At club level in Wexford, Tony Doran, Mick Jacob, Tim Flood R.I.P. and Padge Kehoe R.I.P. were the greatest he has ever seen.

He won his one Wicklow Juvenile medal with Shillelagh in 1958.

JOSIE CASHIN (GERALDINE O'HANRAHANS): Josie Cashin, who resides in Woodbine Court, New Ross, was during his career that spanned over 22 years from 1965 to 1987 a brilliant performer.

He was exceptionally talented as a forward or playing at midfield. He had flair, perception, pace and a brilliant astute brain. It was the latter plus his excellent speed which enabled him to outwit and outsmart several opponents during his long and illustrious hurling career. Josie was a gifted and classy hurler, playing the game with style and elegance.

He was a complete stylist in all the basic skills and was very accurate in his finishing. One of his finest games playing with Geraldine O'Hanrahans was versus Enniscorthy District in the first round of the Senior hurling championship in 1966. Apart from scoring two brilliant goals, he was outstanding in general play.

His perfect balance, his clever manoeuvring, his excellent ball control and fleetness of foot made him a danger throughout. He was born in 1945 and was educated at Michael Street, New Ross. His boyhood hero was Tim Flood R.I.P.

His finest game for the Geraldine O'Hanrahans Senior team was in 1965 versus the Faythe Harriers in round one of the Senior hurling championship, playing left corner-forward. His last outing was in 1987.

When playing he came up against some really competitive defenders, and the most difficult to elude were Matt Browne (Shamrocks), Jimmy Pender (Oulart-The Ballagh), Joe English R.I.P. (Rathnure) and Lar Rigley R.I.P. (Shamrocks). The four Geraldine O'Hanrahans that stood out in Josie's opinion were Mickey Gardiner, Jimmy O'Brien, Christy Martin and the brilliant Tom Neville. His midfield partner at some times was the masterclass Johnny Purcell.

One of the greatest goalies he has seen in hurling was Noel Skehan (Kilkenny). In Wexford, the four greatest hurlers he has ever seen were Bobby Rackard R.I.P., Nickey Rackard R.I.P., Oliver McGrath and Phil Wilson. In Ireland, Mick Roche, Jimmy Doyle R.I.P., Eddie Keher and Henry Shefflin were brilliant.

In Wexford at the present time he is pleased with the displays of Conor McDonald, Liam Og McGovern, Diarmuid O'Keeffe and Jack Guiney. In the last 40 years he selects Mick Jacob, Tony Doran and Martin Quigley as elite stars for both club and county.

He played Juvenile hurling in 1959, 1960 and 1961, winning one Co. medal in 1959. He played Minor in 1961, 1962 and 1963. Apart from his Juvenile medal, he also won one Co. Senior hurling medal in 1966 (his pride and joy), one Special Junior hurling medal in 1968, and one Intermediate hurling medal in 1975.

In winning the All-Ireland in 1996, the players that impressed him the most were Liam Dunne, Martin Storey, Larry O'Gorman and Adrian Fenlon. One of the greatest hurling games he has seen in recent times was the drawn All-Ireland Senior hurling final between Kilkenny and Tipperary in 2014. The finest individual display he has seen was Mick Roche's performance with Tipperary in the first-half of the 1968 All-Ireland final versus Wexford.

The three best dual players he has seen in Wexford were Phil Wilson, Paddy Kehoe and Tom Neville. In Ireland, Teddy McCarthy (Cork), Jimmy Barry-Murphy (Cork) and Michael 'Babs' Keating (Tipperary) were tops. Mick Roche and Frank Cummins were two of the best midfielders he has seen.

KIT CODD (NÉE KEHOE) - CAMOGIE: One of the best known and respected sporting families in the county are the Kehoe clan from Clonleigh near Clonroche. Everyone of the close united family, both the men folk and the courteous ladies have contributed immensely to all aspects of sporting activities in Wexford.

Kit Codd was one of those stalwarts of this unique family. The lady made a big impression with her deeds on the camogie field, both in Wexford and Dublin. Kit now resides at Killaine, Drinagh, just a couple of miles from Wexford town.

During her illustrious career she was a brilliant competitor for club and county. Her overhead striking and sublime stickplay were on a par with anything that the male could perform. When playing in her familiar role she added thrust, grandeur, skill and penetration in attack.

Kit was gifted with an innate capacity to produce outstanding displays in game after game. Any county would have been thrilled to have her in their selection. She was born in 1945 and was educated at Poulpeasty N.S., Mercy Convent, New Ross and Eccles Street Secretarial College in Dublin.

Her hero in her young days was Nickey Rackard R.I.P. All of her sisters played camogie with style, passion, pride and assurance. Many of them along with Kit wore the Wexford purple and gold jersey with distinction and enthusiasm. Her sisters that tasted glory on the camogie fields were Mary, Liz, Josie, Brigid, Annie, Gretta and Eileen. Kit's four daughters also excelled on the camogie scene, playing with dash and zeal, namely Sinéad, Máire, Triona and Aíne. Aíne won three All-Ireland medals and one All Star.

Two of the best goalies Kit has seen were Mags D'Arcy and Kathleen Tonks. In her career she won one All-Ireland medal with Wexford in 1975 and two All-Ireland medals with Dublin in 1965 and 1966. She also won three Leinster medals - one with Wexford and two with Dublin.

In club competitions she won three Co. Senior medals - one with Balllywilliam in 1959 and two with Cloughbawn/Adamstown in 1971 and 1974. Kit played for Wexford in 1975, 1976 and 1977. She also played for Leinster in 1965, 1966 and 1967, winning three medals.

The four greatest camogie players she has ever seen were Una O'Connor (Dublin), Orla Ní Síocháin (Dublin), Angela Downey (Kilkenny) and Kit's own sister, Brigid Doyle. The four most difficult opponents she encountered were Margaret Leacy (nee O'Leary), Elsie Cody (nee Walsh), Peggie Doyle and Joan Murphy (St. John's).

When playing in Wexford the four players that impressed her the most were Mary Dinan (nee Sinnott), Mary Leacy and her sister, Brigid Doyle, and in later years, Catherine O'Loughlin.

One of the greatest games of camogie she has seen was in the 2007 All-Ireland final with Wexford versus Cork. In her club Cloughbawn/Adamstown, her sister, Brigid, was a masterclass player. There are few superlatives that have not been used to describe this brilliant player over many years.

A number of Kit's brothers also wore the Wexford jersey at some stage of their careers. Jim won one All-Ireland Intermediate hurling medal in 1961. Pat, John, Davy and Peter also wore the purple and gold. Eamon was a star performer with his club, Cloughbawn.

Eamon, Pat and Jim have already received Seana Ghael awards for their hurling prowess. Two of Kit's favourite hurlers on the great Wexford team in the '50s were Tim Flood R.I.P. and Nickey Rackard R.I.P. Kit's last game at 48 years young was with St. Martin's versus Kilrush in 1993, playing in goal.

JIMMY CULLEN (LIAM MELLOWS, COOLGREANY): One of the finest goalies to emerge from the north of the county was Jimmy Cullen from the Liam Mellows club in Coolgreany.

From 1963 to 1971 he defied many forwards from getting goals during that period. He had all the qualities that makes a top-class goalie. He was brave, consistent, had great agility, good balance and mobility and a hawk-like eye. Jimmy had lots of confidence in his ability to deal with all kinds of pressure and incoming forwards.

He had the wisdom and judgement of knowing when to stay put or move out to deal with incoming play. Jimmy played with a calculated assurance and used his speed of thought to good effect. He put up a masterly defensive screen behind his fellow defenders. The quality of his saves were first class at all times.

Jimmy was born in 1944 and was educated at Ballyfad N.S. His boyhood hero was Ned Wheeler. The four greatest hurlers he has seen in Wexford in the last 40 years were Mick Jacob, Tony Doran, Ned Buggy and Martin Quigley. The four greatest in Ireland were D.J. Carey, Brian Whelehan, Nicky English and Henry Shefflin.

The two best dual players he has seen in Ireland were Jimmy Barry-Murphy (Cork) and Des Foley R.I.P. (Dublin). In Wexford he selects Phil Wilson and Oliver Cullen as the two that were tops at both codes. Phil Wilson's displays at times in both codes were a joy to watch.

Of the great Wexford teams in the '50s his favourite hurlers were Ned Wheeler, Tim Flood R.I.P. and Padge Kehoe R.I.P. One of his finest games in the goal for Liam Mellows was versus Na Fianna in the 1964 Co. Junior hurling final. He sparkled brilliantly in this encounter and was overjoyed when the final whistle blew. The whole parish was delighted with the club's first Co. hurling win.

Of the present day Wexford hurlers he is impressed with Lee Chin, Jack Guiney, Conor McDonald, Paul Morris and Liam Ryan. Outside of Wexford he selects Henry Shefflin, J.J. Delaney and Michael Fennellly as superb.

Jimmy won one Co. Junior hurling medal with Liam Mellows in 1964 versus Na Fianna and one Co. Intermediate hurling medal in 1967 versus the Shelmaliers. He also won one Junior hurling medal with Killavaney, Wicklow. He was a member of the Wexord Intermediate hurling panel in 1965.

One of the best club teams he has seen in hurling was Buffers Alley teams in the '70s and '80s. One of the greatest hurling finals he has ever seen was Buffers Alley's win versus the Faythe Harriers in 1968.

The two greatest goalies he has ever seen in hurling were Ollie Walsh R.I.P. and Brendan Cummins. The best midfielders he has seen were Frank Cummins, Philie Grimes and Phil Wilson. The greatest hurlers he has seen over the years were Mick Roche, Jimmy Doyle R.I.P., Henry Shefflin, Tommy Walsh, Eddie Keher and Brian Whelahan.

In football he selected Mick O'Connell, Matty McDonagh R.I.P. (Galway), Colm 'The Gooch' Cooper, Peter Canavan and Matty Forde as masterclass players. When playing in goal the forwards that caused him the most problems were Joe Murphy (Buffers Alley), Tom Guinan (Ferns), Harry Doyle R.I.P. (Gorey and Clough) and that powerful centre-forward from Craanford, Mylie Donohoe.

The four Liam Mellows hurlers that stood out in Jimmy's opinion were his brother Tom Cullen, a brilliant centre half-back, the classy Oliver Cullen, Paddy Lennon and Seán Sheridan. Jimmy was also a selector and committee member with the club. Fiacre O Lionáin was a great full-back to play behind, Paddy 'Blondie' Cullen and John Cullen were other brothers of Jimmy's.

TOM DALY (MONAGEER-BOOLAVOGUE): Tom Daly, originally from Tomsallagh near Ferns and now based in far off California, was for ten years or so one of Monageer-Boolavogue's most enterprising and skilful players.

He normally played at right half-forward where he used his great skill and his intelligent brain to outwit and outsmart most of the defenders who had the task of keeping him in check. His display at times was sheer coolness personified.

He was positive, competent and composed, and displayed all the artistry and economy of movement. When playing in his familiar position, he was always first to the ball and quick and decisive in his movements. Tom was a supreme stylist in all the skills of hurling and was always full of running.

He was born in 1937 and was educated at Monageer N.S. His boyhood heroes were Mick Mackey R.I.P. (Limerick) in hurling and Tommy Murphy R.I.P. (Laois) in football. Some of the great goalies he has seen in hurling were Tony Reddin, Ollie Walsh R.I.P., Pat Nolan (Oylegate-Glenbrien) and Kevin Matthews R.I.P. (Dublin). The greatest defender he has ever seen in hurling was Bobby Rackard R.I.P. and the greatest forward he has ever seen was Christy Ring R.I.P.

One of the best midfielders he has seen was Joe Salmon R.I.P. (Galway). In Wexford. excluding the great team of the '50s, he selects Phil Wilson, Mick Jacob, Tony Doran and John Nolan R.I.P. who were as good as any county has produced.

One of the greatest club teams he has seen was the Rathnure side from 1970 to 1974. His last year playing with his club was in 1968 before he moved away. With the Monageer-Boolavogue club he was Chairman, District rep. and coach for the under-age. Two of the best dual players he has seen were Jimmy Barry-Murphy (Cork) and Phil Wilson.

One of the best individual performances he has seen at club level was by Oliver Gough playing with Ferns versus Rathnure in the championship. That day Oliver put on a 'Rolls Royce' of a performance.

One of Tom's finest games was versus Blackwater in the 1962 Enniscorthy District championship. The four Monageer-Boolavogue hurlers that impressed him the most were Ned O'Brien, Ger Nolan, Dick Walsh and Mike Rowsome. In earlier years, Francis Fenlon R.I.P., John Darcy R.I.P. and Willie Stamp R.I.P. were special hurlers in the club. Frank Cox was a great, lethal corner-forward.

When playing in the Enniscorthy District the players he found most difficult to elude were Jimmy Nolan (Davidstown-Courtnacuddy), a real masterclass hurler, Robbie Jacob (Oulart-The Ballagh), who would stick to you like a barnacle, the strong and hard-hitting Larry Whelan (Blackwater) and the brilliant man from the Duffry Rovers club, Mick Delaney.

One of the greatest games of hurling he has seen was the 1956 Co. Junior semi-final between Ferns and Oylegate-Glenbrien. Tom played Juvenile hurling with Monageer in 1953, Minor hurling with Buffers Alley in 1954, and Minor hurling and football with Ferns in 1955.

In 1959 he was injured in a match with Monageer-Boolavogue versus Enniscorthy Shamrocks. He was taken to hospital and spent a week recovering from a severe fractured nose, but both his nose and his game never recovered after that.

TOMMY DELANEY (DAVIDSTOWN-COURTNACUDDY): Tommy Delaney, who resides in Courtnacuddy in the parish of Davidstown, was during his hurling career one of the game's most consistent performers over a number of years.

His shrewd, recognisable way of covering his area was praiseworthy. He was a player with excellent skill, courage, determination and reliability. He had a superb attitude and was a brilliant striker of the ball, overhead or on the ground.

Tommy was a very intelligent and clever player with lots of skill. He was always positioned in the right place at the right time to get his numerous deliveries down to his forwards. He was a very tight and vigorous marker, forceful and tenacious in his tackling, and no opponent could ever say after a game that they had a field day playing opposite Tommy.

He was born in 1944 and was educated at Courtnacuddy N.S. His boyhood hero was Nickey Rackard R.I.P. The four most difficult opponents he encountered in his hurling career were Martin Quigley (Rathnure), John Quigley (Rathnure), Christy Keogh R.I.P. (Rapperees) and Mick Butler (Buffers Alley).

The five Davidstown-Courtnacuddy players that impressed him the most were Sim Gallagher R.I.P., Jimmy Nolan, Liam Kehoe, Andy Carty and Tommy's brother, Larry Delaney. The two best dual players he has seen in Ireland were Des Foley R.I.P. (Dublin) and Jimmy Barry-Murphy (Cork). In Wexford, Phil Wilson (Ballyhogue) and Joe Foley (Ballyhogue), were tops.

One of the finest games of hurling he has seen was the clash in 1968 between Buffers Alley versus Ballyhogue-Davidstown United. It was a brilliant contest from the start to finish. Tommy first played with Davidstown-Courtnacuddy in 1961. His last appearance with his club was in 1978.

He also won one Co. Intermediate medal with Cloughbawn in 1973. In 1967, playing with Fr. Murphy's (London), he won one Junior honour with Joe Foley, Matty Mernagh and Tommy Harrell on the team. He won one Rackard League hurling honour with Courtnacuddy versus Kilmore in 1958.

One of the great individual displays he has seen were given by Mick Jacob (Oulart-The Ballagh) versus Rathnure in the 1974 Co. Senior hurling final. He also played football and one of his finest games was in 1969 with Ballyhogue-Davidstown versus St. Anne's in a Senior encounter.

The five greatest hurlers he has seen in Wexford in the last 40 years were Mick Jacob (Oulart-The Ballagh), Tony Doran (Buffers Alley), Dan Quigley (Rathnure), Martin Quigley (Rathnure) and Colm Doran (Buffers Alley). One of the greatest goalies he has seen was Damien Fitzhenry, and the greatest goal he has seen scored was by John Fenton (Cork).

The greatest hurler he has seen ever was Jimmy Doyle (Tipperary) R.I.P. Of the present-day hurlers he selects Joe Canning (Galway), Seamus Callanan (Tipperary), Paudge Collins (Clare), Tony Kelly (Clare) and Henry Shefflin (Kilkenny) as the best.

For the Wexford Senior team he played in an Oireachtas Cup semi-final in 1970 played in Croke Park. The best club hurling team he has seen in Wexford was Rathnure in the early '70s. They were a special combination.

One of the greatest games of hurling he has seen was the 2014 All-Ireland Senior clash of Kilkenny and Tipperary in the drawn final. He played Juvenile and Minor with Davidstown-Courtnacuddy and lost the Co. Minor semi final to Ferns in 1962. Tommy's finest game for his team was versus Buffers Alley in the 1965 Senior hurling championship.

JOE DORAN (BUFFERS ALLEY): One of the best-known sporting families in the county are the Doran brothers from Monagrena. The four brothers - Bill, Joe, Tony and Colm - are household names wherever G.A.A. is discussed.

They had fanned the flames of Buffers Alley teams throughout from the middle '60s to the end of the '80s. Joe the second eldest of this remarkable hurling family who gave everything to club and county. He did most of his hurling with the club at midfield, but played in a number of other positions including full-forward in their Co. Junior hurling win in the early '80s.

On many occasions during his impeccable career he lit up the scene with his magnificent never-say-die attitude. He loved playing the game as did all of his brothers. His wholehearted and impressive displays were the talk of the club and county. He never spared himself in his role with his unlimited stamina, his grandeur and his amazing skill and endurance.

He was born in 1944 and was educated at Boolavogue N.S. and Gorey C.B.S. His boyhood hero like so many others was Nickey Rackard R.I.P. One of the best goalies he has seen in hurling was Damien Fitzhenry. The two best dual players he has ever seen were Jimmy Barry-Murphy (Cork) and our own Phil Wilson.

The three greatest hurlers he has seen over the years were Eddie Keher, Jimmy Doyle R.I.P. and John Connolly (Galway). In Wexford in the last 40 years his brother Tony, Mick Jacob and Tom Dempsey excelled. One of the greatest hurling club teams he has seen was the Buffers Alley set-up from 1982 to 1986.

Joe's last-ever game playing for his club was in a 1985 Junior 'B' hurling game. He first played with Buffers Alley in 1961 when he was just 17 years old. He was a selector with various hurling and football teams. He was also club Secretary from 1987 to 1992.

One of the greatest individual displays he has seen was given by Bill Murphy (Buffers Alley) versus the Faythe Harriers in the 1968 Co. Senior hurling final. Buffers Alley were eight points down with just ten minutes to go, but Bill scored two goals and three points to win the club's first Co. Senior title.

Joe's finest hour playing the game was versus Oulart-The Ballagh in the 1975 Co. Senior hurling final. He played a blinder on that occasion. The four Buffers Alley hurlers that impressed him the most over the years were Tony Doran, Colm Doran, Mick Butler and Tom Dempsey

When playing with his club the four most difficult opponents he encountered were Martin Byrne (Rathnure), Pat Sinnott (Shamrocks), Tommy Hawkins (Ferns) and Christy Keogh R.I.P. Two of the greatest games he has seen at club level were Buffers Alley versus Rathnure in the 1988 Co. Senior hurling final in a drawn game with a scoreline of 2-14 to 3-11. The second was the replay with a scoreline of 2-10 to 1-5, with both games in Wexford Park.

He played Juvenile hurling and football with Buffers Alley in 1959 and 1960, and with Young Emmets in 1960. He played Minor hurling with Ferns in 1961 and 1962.

The best centre half-back he has seen in Wexford was Dan Quigley and the best full-forward he has seen was Tony Doran. He played Intermediate hurling with Wexford in 1965. He was also a well-known referee for various games too.

His medal collection includes the following: four Co. Senior hurling, one Co. Junior hurling, one Co. Intermediate football, one Co. Junior football, one Co. Junior 'B' hurling, one Co. Under-21 hurling, and with Wexford: one All-Ireland Under-21 hurling, two Leinser Under-21 hurling and two Leinster Intermediate hurling.

CON DOWDALL (DAN O'CONNELL'S, FAYTHE HARRIERS): Con Dowdall was one of Wexford town's finest dual players. It did not matter whether he was playing football with the Dan O'Connell's or hurling with the Faythe Harriers, he always gave 100% in both codes.

He was a masterclass performer for both his teams. With his non-stop running, his intelligent positional sense and his unlimited energy, he was quite a handful for most of his opponents. He was very clever, cool and confident, never flustered and always looked to be the master of all the surveyed.

With the Dan O'Connell's he played some delightful football. He was very quick to gain possession and with his surging runs, and his brilliance in controlling the ball, his expert thrust and precision and accuracy were features of his play.

In hurling with the Faythe Harriers and Wexford teams he was a revelation and on countless occasions turned out to be a match-winner. On account of his prowess in hurling he was better known in the small ball category. The ones who had to oppose him in the big ball could tell you a different story. Trying to keep tabs on him was a nightmare.

He was born in 1945 and was educated at Wexford C.B.S. His boyhood hero was Christy Ring R.I.P. The best goalie he has seen in football was Paddy Cullen (Dublin), while the best in hurling was Ollie Walsh R.I.P. The two best dual players he has seen were Jimmy Barry-Murphy and Ray Cummins. In Wexford , Oliver Cullen and Martin Bergin R.I.P. were brilliant at the two games.

Con's finest hour in his Dan O'Connell's jersey was versus Oulart-The Ballagh in their 1976 Co. Junior football final win. He played with unrelenting grandeur and with precision. He was a perfectionist and his control, balance and reflexes made him an impossible target to keep in check.

The four greatest footballers he has seen were Mick O'Dwyer, Des Foley R.I.P., Kevin Heffernan and Mick O'Connell.

The four Dan O'Connell's footballers who stood out in his opinion were Billy Colfer R.I.P., Ger Howlin, Pascal Whitmore and Jimmy Whelan. The four best footballers he has seen in Wexford were Oliver Cullen (Castletown), Matty Forde (Kilanerin), Andy Merrigan R.I.P. (Castletown) and David Murphy (St. Mary's, Rosslare).

The four greatest hurlers he has seen in Wexford were Nickey Rackard R.I.P., Nick O'Donnell R.I.P., Billy Rackard R.I.P. and Oliver McGrath. The greatest footballer he has ever seen was Des Foley R.I.P. (Dublin). The greatest hurler he has ever seen was Christy Ring (Cork).

Of the present day footballers he was always a big fan of Kieran Donaghy (Kerry). The best club team he has seen in football was the Castletown team from 1965 to the end of the '70s.

Con first played Junior football with the Dan O'Connell's in 1969 and his last outing was in 1983. He played Minor football with St. Joseph's and Under-21 football also.

He won one Leinster and one All-Ireland Minor medal in 1963, three Under-21 Leinster medals in 1964, 1965 and 1966, and one All Ireland Under-21 medal in 1965. With the Faythe Harriers in hurling he played Senior with them from 1962 to 1983, winning three Co. medals in 1962, 1965 and 1981 and one Junior football medal with the Dan O'Connell's in 1976.

He played Senior for Wexford from 1965 to 1972. The Faythe Harriers had many great hurlers in the period that he played with them. Tony Doran and Mick Jacob were magnificent club hurlers over many years.

DONAL DOYLE OUR LADY'S ISLAND): Donal Doyle was born to be a star goalie with his agility, eagle eye, razor sharp reflexes, spring heel advances and courage in abundance.

Sometimes two or three forwards poured down on his goal, but try as they might they were unable to get the ball past the indomitable Donal. He had the foresight of a master at work as bewildered and bewitched forwards made big efforts to score a goal against him.

One of his best years in the Our Lady's Island jersey was in 1962 when the club won the Co. Junior hurling championship. He was truly magnificent during all their games that year, especially versus St. Fintan's, with his ability to stop balls which seemed destined for the net. All those brilliant saves had a demoralising effect on forwards who tried to get a score against him.

He was born in 1943 and was educated at Carne N.S., Our Lady's Island N.S. and St. Peter's College, Wexford. His boyhood hero was Jim Morrissey R.I.P. He first played adult hurling in 1961 and he last lined out in 1975.

The best dual player he has seen in Wexford was Ted Morrissey. His two brothers, Ray and Leo, now deceased, were also brilliant players with Our Lady's Island. His uncle, Willie 'The Dentist' Doyle R.I.P., played Senior football for Wexford in the '20s.

The two best hurlers he has seen over the years in Wexford were Jim Morrissey R.I.P. and Liam Dunne. The two best hurlers he has seen in Ireland were Henry Shefflin (Kilkenny) and D.J. Carey (Kilkenny).

Donal won one Co. Junior hurling medal with Our Lady's Island in 1962, one Leinster Junior 'B' medal with the College in 1960, and one All-Ireland Colleges medal with St. Peter's in 1962.

One of the best games in hurling he has seen in Wexford at club level was Buffers Alley versus the Faythe Harriers in the 1968 Co. Senior final. Donal played Minor hurling with Our Lady's Island/St. Fintan's in 1961.

The two best dual players he has seen in Ireland were Jimmy Barry-Murphy (Cork) and Ray Cummins (Cork). One of the best club teams he has seen in Wexford was Buffers Alley in the '70s and '80s. He also selects Rathnure who were good also, winning four titles in a row.

The best individual display he has seen at club level in Wexford was given by Bob Kearns versus St. Martin's in the Wexford District Junior final in 1962. The four forwards he would select as the most lethal around his goal area were Frank Doyle R.I.P. (St. Fintan's), Seamus 'Shanks' Whelan (St. Martin's), Eamonn Doyle (Cushinstown) and Robbie Jacob (Oulart-The Ballagh).

The four best Our Lady's Island players he has seen while playing with them were Bob Kearns, Danny Sinnott, Ray Doyle R.I.P. and Paddy Parle. The most exciting game of hurling that he played in was with Our Lady's Island versus St. Martin's in a Wexford District Junior semi-final in 1962.

The three hurlers he would select as the best he has seen in Wexford in the last 20 years were Damien Fitzhenry, Liam Dunne and Martin Storey. The best goalie he has seen in hurling was Ollie Walsh R.I.P.

SEAN DOYLE (DUFFRY ROVERS): Seán Doyle, originally from Ballindaggin and now residing in Bellefield, Enniscorthy, was from 1959 to 1968 one of his club's best defenders.

He started playing Junior with the old Caim-Kiltealy teams and then when the club changed its name to the Duffry Rovers he lined out with them. He missed out on their Intermediate win in 1969.

When playing at full-back in most of his games, he was on top with his usual commanding control. Any attack from the opposition was subdued regularly with ruthless efficiency. His strength and vision enabled him to dominate his patch around the goal area.

He was born in 1942 and was educated at Ballindaggin N.S. His boyhood hero was Nickey Rackard R.I.P. He played Juvenile and Minor hurling with Caim-Kiltealy in the late '50s, losing out to Kilmore- Rathangan in the 1957 Co. Juvenile hurling final. Seán played Co. Minor hurling with Wexford in 1959 and was a substitute for them in 1960.

His finest hour in the Duffry Rovers colours was versus Ballyhogue in a replay game in 1965. He was steady, reliable and tenacious, and his playing was assured and composed. His anticipation and positional play was never seen to better effect. His striking of the ball and overall general display was out of the top drawer.

The two best dual players he has seen in Wexford were Phil Wilson and Harry O'Connor R.I.P. Seán was on the losing side with Caim-Kiltealy versus the Faythe Harriers in the 1956 Co. Juvenile hurling final.

The best dual player he has seen in Ireland was Des Foley R.I.P. (Dublin). He was a keen follower of the old Caim-Kiltealy team which contested the 1949 and 1950 Co. Junior hurling final with Joe Foley R.I.P., Tom Roche R.I.P., James Codd R.I.P. and Tom Dunne R.I.P., all of whom where brilliant hurlers. His brothers also played.

The best individual display he has seen at club level was given by Paul Lynch R.I.P. for the Shamrocks versus Geraldine O'Hanrahans when he scored 1-11. The four best hurlers he has seen while playing with the Duffry Rovers were Mick Delaney, Jim Cooper, James O'Gorman and Pat Doyle.

The four most difficult hurlers that he played were Harry Jeffs R.I.P. (Monageer-Boolavogue), Frank Cox (Monageer-Boolavogue), Ned Walsh (Hollow Rangers) and Liam Swan (Ballyhogue). The two hurlers he selects as the best he has seen in Ireland were Mick Birmingham (Dublin) and Seán Clohessy (Kilkenny).

The two best hurlers he has seen in Wexford were Bobby Rackard R.I.P. and Tim Flood R.I.P. The best game of hurling he has seen in Wexford was Rathnure versus St. Aidan's in the 1955 Co. Senior final.

He played Juvenile with Caim-Kiltealy in 1956, 1957 and 1958. He also played Minor hurling and football with Caim-Kiltealy in 1958, 1959 and 1960. He most exciting game of hurling that he played in was with Ballyhouge versus the Duffry Rovers in the 1965 Enniscorthy District drawn game. Ballyhogue had a powerful team with Phil Wilson and Joe Foley being their stars. They went on to win the Co. Junior hurling final.

Seán usually played full-back, but he also lined out at corner-back and full-forward for the Duffry Rovers. The best goalie he has seen in hurling was Ollie Walsh R.I.P.

JIMMY FANNING (OYLEGATE-GLENBRIEN): Jimmy Fanning, who now resides in Co. Kildare, gave ten years of unbroken service to his beloved hurling team, Oylegate-Glenbrien.

From 1962-1972, his class marking was decisive and in his left corner-back position he had to contain several fleet-footed forwards during that period. His great vision and confidence allowed him to master most of them adequately.

He had excellent composure and alertness in close exchanges and was never over-awed by the reputation of any of his opponents. He was prepared to harass and fight for every ball in his patch of the field and his action at all times was intense and sustained for the full game. His ability to tackle an opponent into losing possession without giving away any frees was praiseworthy.

He was born in 1944 and was educated at Glenbrien N.S. and Enniscorthy C.B.S. His boyhood hero was Billy Rackard R.I.P. The four greatest hurlers he has ever seen were Christy Ring R.I.P. and Billy Rackard in the '50s and in later years, Michael 'Babs' Keating and Henry Shefflin.

The five of the 1950s and '60s great team that stood out were Billy Rackard R.I.P. and Nickey Rackard R.I.P., and in the '60s, Tom Neville, Phil Wilson and John Nolan R.I.P.. The two best dual players he has seen in Ireland were Des Foley R.I.P. (Dublin) and Jimmy Barry-Murphy (Cork). In Wexford, Paddy Kehoe and Willie Foley R.I.P. were class.

One of the most exciting and memorable games he played in was the 1963 Co. Senior hurling final - Oylegate united with Ballyhogue winning by 6-9 to Horeswood's 2-4. It was Jimmy's finest game in his club colours. Although he was only 19 years old, he performed brilliantly at left corner-back and was never perturbed by the big occasion, settling into his game from the off.

Of the present day Wexford players he is very impressed with Keith Rossiter, Conor McDonald, Jack Guiney and Liam Ryan. Outside of Wexford, Henry Shefflin, Richie Hogan, J.J. Delaney and Paul Murphy of Kilkenny are super players.

In the past 40 years, the Wexford hurlers that stood out at both club and inter-county level were Tony Doran, Mick Jacob, Dan Quigley, Martin Quigley and Christy Keogh R.I.P.. He played Co. Minor hurling with Wexford in 1962.

One of the great club teams he has ever seen over the years was the Rathnure team which won four Co. Senior hurling titles in a row in the early '70s. The greatest goalie he has seen was Oylegate's Pat Nolan who for so many years was their star elite. Phil Wilson as a midfielder was one of the best he has seen.

The greatest hurler he has seen was Henry Shefflin, who made the game so simple, and in football Mick O'Connell was a pure star. Jimmy won one Leinster Colleges Junior 'B' and Senior 'B' medals with Enniscorthy C.B.S.

The greatest inter-county match he has seen was the 2014 All-Ireland Senior final in the drawn game between Kilkenny and Tipperary. When playing in the championship the players who caused him the most problems were Con Dowdall (Faythe Harriers), Paul Lynch R.I.P., Oliver McGrath and Seán Walsh (Mooncoin). Mick Bennett R.I.P. was a joy to watch when playing with Oylegate-Glenbrien.

JIM FLEMING (KILANERIN): Throughout the '60s Jim Fleming was an outstanding corner-back for his club, Kilanerin. In this position he cut off the route by opposing forwards to get scores for their teams.

He started playing Junior for his club in 1961 versus Buffers Alley in a Gorey District game. He was only 17 years old and he displayed the form that made him an excellent corner-back during his career. He had to give up playing in 1969 because of commitments to the family farm. He was unable to train etc. so he called it a day.

In doing so he missed out on Co. Intermediate and Senior medals later on. Over the period of his playing career he showed a real ability to marshal his No. 2 position and always showed a rocky road to goal for the best of scoring corner-forwards.

He showed great courage, guile, grit and phyiscal fitness. He always covered his patch in excellent fashion and was well-organised in his role of defensive duties.

He was born in 1944 and was educated at Kilanerin N.S. His boyhood hero was Nickey Rackard R.I.P. One of the best goalies he has seen in football was Paddy Cullen (Dublin).

During his career in the '60s, Jim came up against some elusive and

score-getting forwards and selects the following as the four he found the most difficult to handle: Seamus 'Shanks' Whelan (St. Martin's), Tom O'Donnell (St. Martin's), Dan Kennedy R.I.P. (Kilrush) and Pat O'Brien (Geraldine O'Hanrahans). One of his finest games for Kilanerin was versus Buffers Alley in the 1963 Gorey District championship. He had an exceptional game in this encounter and repelled all the advances of the Alley's forward line.

The three best Kilanerin footballers he has seen were Seamus Boland, Paddy Hughes and Mick D'Arcy. In later years Matty Forde and John Hegarty were brilliant. He played Minor football with Kilanerin in 1961 and 1962.

The greatest footballers he has ever seen were Jack O'Shea (Kerry), Mikey Sheehy (Kerry), Colm Cooper (Kerry). Bernard Brogan Snr. (Dublin), Martin Newell (Galway) and Peter Canavan (Tyrone). In Wexford, Freddie Cudlipp, Seán Sheridan, Oliver Cullen, Phil Wilson, Andy Merrigan R.I.P. and Matty Forde were all masterclass and brilliant footballers.

The two best dual players he has ever seen were Ray Cummins and Jimmy Barry-Murphy. In Wexford, he selects Phil Wilson and Oliver Cullen. Over the past ten years the footballers that stood out in his opinion were Brian Dooher, Michael Murphy (Donegal), Colm Cooper, Bernard Brogan and Tómas O'Sé (Kerry).

One of the greatest games of football he has seen was Dublin versus Kerry in the 2013 All-Ireland semi-final. One of the greatest individual performances he has seen was given by Brian Dooher for Tyrone in the 2003 All-Ireland final.

In Wexford, the best club team he has seen in football was the Duffry Rovers team which won so many Co. Senior Titles from 1986 to 1994. He also selects Buffers Alley as the best club team in hurling too.

Tim Flood's display in the 1960 All-Ireland final was also special. He is disappointed in the way hurling in the county has gone back. The greatest footballer he has seen was Mick O'Connell (Kerry). Of the present-day hurlers, Jackie Tyrrell, Richie Hogan, Joe Canning and Tony Kelly are class.

This series will continue over the coming weeks when the remaining recipients will be profiled.

As well as those featured in this edition, the following will receive awards on Sunday:

Joe Foley, Patrick Fortune, Tom Harpur (posthumous), John Hartley, Donal Hayden, Tommy Hayes, James Hendrick, Willie Kelly, Mick Kinsella, Tommy Kirwan, Mick Leacy, Tony Maher, Joe McCarthy, Albert McDonald, Declan McPartlin, Marty Moran, Patsy Murray, Liam Murphy, Peadar Murphy, Toddy Murphy, Willie Murphy, Eugene Nolan, Paddy O'Leary, Tony O'Loughlin, Conor O'Rafferty, Paddy O'Reilly, Tommy O'Rourke, Joe O'Shaughnessy, Johnny Parle, Pat Poole, Luke Power, Johnny Purcell, Dan Quigley, Noel Ronan, Nicky Rossiter, Davy Rowe, Tommy Rowe, Eugene Ryan, Jim Ryan, Vinny Staples, Freddie Swords, John Tubritt, Willie Walsh, Ger Waters, Martin Whelan.

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