independent

Monday 23 October 2017

Retail sector gets back on its feet with new shops opening

SEVERAL NEW OUTLETS OPEN OR ABOUT TO OPEN IN WEXFORD

CONOR CULLEN

WEXFORD'S struggling retail sector has been boosted by the opening of new businesses in prominent Main Street locations.

The Fitzgerald family's Jack & Jones outlet opened last Thursday and was followed at the weekend by the official opening of Ruthy's boutique around the corner in the Bull Ring.

Meanwhile, work is currently ongoing, also at the Bull Ring, on the former First Active premises, which will house British retailer Fat Face, with Pamela Scott opening in the former Sasha premises on North Main Street.

Outside of the clothes retailers, there are also developments at either end of the Main Street, with Brash hairdressers opening on South Main Street, and a new pharmacy set to be opened in Selskar by local pharmacist Eric Jenkins.

Aoife Fitzgerald said they are delighted with the start they've had in Jack & Jones, which is housed in the former ACC bank premises and cost her family in excess of €1m earlier this year.

'It's going great. We've had a great start, I'm delighted with the shop,' said Aoife, whose family has menswear outlets in Wexford, Waterford and Clonmel.

Aoife said she has been struck by the amount of well-wishers they've had in since they opened last Thursday, with many Wexford people wishing them all the best with their business.

However, she's positive about the outlook, saying that the product is very affordable and that there was a gap in the market for a clothes retailer catering for younger men in Wexford.

Meanwhile, on the outskirts of town, in the Clonard Retail Park, Byrne's World of Wonder has opened a new discount store, Super Euro.

The store has been attracting plenty of customers since opening its doors on Saturday morning (it will be open seven days a week) and James Byrne feels it will prove very successful for his family's business.

'We had space out there and there's definitely a great demand from customers at the moment for a lower-cost alternative,' said James.

The shop, which sells low-cost goods in bulk, employs 12 people between full-and part-time workers. 'Hopefully, we'll grow that,' said James.

Most Read

News